Strathcona Renewal

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How could Strathcona Centre Community Be Better For Walking?

Making Strathcona Centre more walkable generally means introducing design elements to cut the volume and speed of cars throughout the neighbourhood. This can be achieved using various design elements.

Here are some possible design elements, taken from a paper by called “Urban Design White Paper – Local Street Design Ideas for Strathcona” by Lucas Sherwin, that could be employed:

  • Chicanes: this street element “consists of meandering a driving lane horizontally as it moves down the street”. Some examples:

    Chicane in Garneau

    Chicane in Garneau

    Generic Chicane (NACTO)

    Generic Chicane (NACTO)

  • Curb Extensions: Curb extensions “are extensions of the sidewalk into what would be space used by vehicles.” In Strathcona Centre these could be put near any/all intersections to eliminate illegal parking (too close to the intersection) and shorten crossings for people walking. Examples:

    Curb extensions near the Prince of Wales Armory (108 Ave. and 104 Str.)

    Curb extensions near the Prince of Wales Armory (108 Ave. and 104 Str.)

    This curb extension even collects rainwater runoff.

    This curb extension even collects rainwater runoff.

  • Neighbourhood Roundabouts: Some of these mini traffic circles have already been installed at the intersections of 96, 97 and 98 streets and 83 avenue. They slow down vehicles and provide a visual cue that an obstacle is in the upcoming intersection, thereby slowing mid-block speeds. Here is an example:

    Neighbourhood Roundabout (Traffic Circle). Image from NACTO

    Neighbourhood Roundabout (Traffic Circle). Image from NACTO

Many other design features could be used to change how safe and comfortable walking in Strathcona Centre feels. Some examples of these are neckdowns, pedestrian lighting, raised crosswalks, woonerfs and diverters.

We encourage residents of Strathcona to come and share their thoughts and ideas at the upcoming open house on March 6, 2017.

 

Community League Working With U of A Student Team

The streets of Strathcona Centre Neighbourhood were laid out well over a hundred years ago. So wouldn’t it make sense, if the city is going to invest about $25 million in renewing the streets and sidewalks of the area, that the design of said streets and sidewalks be reconsidered?

The Strathcona Centre Community League (SCCL) is preparing to engage the city for its upcoming renewal process (happening 2019 – 2021). We think that the massive investment that is the city is going to make should be leveraged by first rethinking how our neighbourhood could be make better for walking and biking before the shovels hit the ground.

Urban Design Student Partnership

The SCCL Renewal Committee is working with a team of students from the University of Alberta’s Urban Planning Committee. These four students are creating three different concept plans for the neighbourhood, each of which will present a different vision for what it will look like after reconstruction.

The students will be creating their concept plans from January – April of 2017, and presenting their ideas to the public in early March.

NoteThe partnership with the U of A students is separate from the City-led renewal process. SCCL will use the information gathered through this initiative to engage with the City.

Here is the Terms of Reference document that describes the project between the community league and the student team.

 

Strathcona Centre Community League Strikes Ad-Hoc Committee To Prepare For Neighbourhood Renewal

Posted on February 24, 2017 by Conrad
The City of Edmonton invests in the infrastructure of its residential areas, their streets, sidewalks and street lights, through the Building Great Neighbourhoods program (source). Communities are targeted for renewal in accordance with four-year capital budget cycles. Strathcona Centre Neighbourhood, located just north of Whyte Avenue, between Mill Creek Ravine and 107 Street, will be renewed during the 2019-2023 cycle.

Map of Strathcona Centre Neighbourhood

Map of Strathcona Centre Neighbourhood

Map of Strathcona Centre Neighbourhood

Traditionally, Building Great Neighbourhoods has proposed a “like for like” replacement of infrastructure, with minor additions to improve walkability (adding missing sidewalks being the most common of these). However, in 2013 the community of Queen Alexandra, located directly south of Strathcona Centre, organized to advocate for the inclusion of an element of new street design in its neighbourhood renewal. Due to timing constraints, only the two collector roads of 76 Avenue and 106 Street were given consideration (project web page).

The Strathcona Centre Community League is very excited by Queen Alexandra’s success in leveraging the city’s investment in order to create a more walkable, bikable, livable area. The League thinks that the same type of process can and should be applied to the entire Strathcona neighbourhood, so it struck an ad-hoc committee in late 2016. This website will showcase the committee’s work and help inform the community about events and potential actions related to the process.